sediment Tag

Sampling of the Middle and South River May Be Key to Accurate Nutrient Pollution Data

[caption id="attachment_1140" align="alignleft" width="300"] Middle RIver, Augusta County[/caption] Augusta County is voluntarily considering a sampling program to determine the amount of pollutants that are leaving the county via its two primary waterways – the Middle and South rivers.  Now that the EPA has provided the “green light” of acceptance, it’s back in the county’s court to decide whether to proceed with the sampling. The decision to move forward has been hinging on whether or not grants could be obtained to meet operational costs as well as uncertainty about whether the EPA would accept the data. EPA has now deemed that the proposed monitoring "is consistent with other monitoring being done as part of the Chesapeake Bay River monitoring program." Supervisors will revisit the sampling idea when they meet in late July. For more details, click to read the news article: http://www.dailyprogress.com/newsvirginian/news/epa-says-it-would-accept-data-from-augusta-county-on/article_dbf1f1b0-decc-11e2-b36d-001a4bcf6878.html...

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James City County Developers to See New Fees in 2014

The EPA is mandating stricter stormwater management regulations in Virginia, particularly in response to the Chesapeake Bay TMDL – and word about the upcoming changes to the Virginia Stormwater Management Program permit requirements and increased fees are starting to trickle out. The jury is still out on how much the regulations and its fees will deter development after implementation in July 2014, but localities, like James City County, are starting the process to educate elected officials and the public now to minimize surprises in the future. Read more about James City County’s efforts here: http://wydaily.com/2013/03/03/jcc-developers-to-face-new-stormwater-fees-regulations/...

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More and More Communities Making it Easier to Conserve Rainwater

Recently, the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District hosted a rain barrel workshop where local residents learned more about the benfits of rainwater harvesting not only towards rainwater/water conservation, but also how rain barrels can help homeowners to reduce their stormwater impact. Nicola McGoff with the TJSWCD  discussed the environmental benefits (of rain barrels) like saving energy and reducing stormwater runoff, which in turn reduces the amount of sediments, bacteria and chemicals carried into natural water sources during rainfalls. http://www2.nelsoncountytimes.com/news/nelson-news/2012/apr/25/rain-barrels-not-just-farmers-ar-1867924/ Is your community offering similar programs to help the environment and educate the citizenry?...

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In Charlottesville, DEQ Briefs Localities on Quality of Area Streams

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="400" caption="Tara Sieber of the DEQ stands in front of a map depicting impaired streams"][/caption] The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality hired experts from Virginia Tech's Biological Systems Engineering Department to help assess the levels of pollutants in Lodge Creek, Meadow Creek, Moores Creek and Schenks Branch (all considered impaired channels by DEQ since they are not healthy environments for aquatic life) as well as throughout the watershed. How much sediment flows through Moore's Creek annually? Follow the link to Charlottesville Tommorrow's coverage to find out. http://cvilletomorrow.typepad.com/charlottesville_tomorrow_/2012/03/local-water-quality.html...

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EPA to Virginia – “Refine Your Detailed Bay TMDL Plan…Or Else”

[caption id="attachment_696" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Shores of the James River"][/caption] It looks like the EPA will not be relinquishing their oversight of Virginia’s management of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL anytime soon. As noted in this Newsleader.com (Staunton, Virginia) article, the EPA returned Virginia’s plan for the clean-up of the Bay with harsh criticism, a deadline of March 30th for resubmittal, and threats of federal action if  "EPA requests are ignored or deadlines missed." We’ll keep you posted on how the Commonwealth is dealing with the latest requirements of the EPA. Are we on the right path to success? http://www.newsleader.com/article/20120224/NEWS01/202240311...

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Virginia Beach’s Lynnhaven River – Progress In the Making

Reducing the discharge of pollutants  to our waterways does result in a revitalization of the associated ecosystems.  That progress can seem slow; however, since the pollutants were released over several decades the cleanup will likely require a similar timeframe.  Implementation of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL will address the release of nitrates, phosphorous and sediment to the Bay from both point and nonpoint sources.  The following article discusses the Lynnhaven River and notes that visible progress can be made in less than a decade.  Compliance with the Bay TMDL will present difficult choices and potential for increased expenditures.   When compliance results in visible progress at the scale of the Bay and elsewhere throughout Virginia, similar to that seen locally on the Lynnhaven River, then the cost/benefit will become more palatable.  The complexity of the Bay ecosystem and the uncertainties associated with the model used to evaluate the health of the Bay and the...

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How Will Virginia Stormwater TMDL’s Affect Virginia Colleges and Universities?

The Virginia TMDL implementation process is moving ahead. Planning District Commissions have forwarded requests to municipalities for data to be submitted by February, 2012, but state Colleges and Universities may not be fully included in this process. Often municipalities may submitt land cover data and BMP data on behalf of the institution without consultation or submit data without including the land area of these campuses. Either approach can leave the institution unrepresented in the process and may result in increased TMDL reduction allocations. The following is a summary of recent conversation with DCR on this topic: If a College or University has an MS4 permit, the institution will report compliance with TMDL directly to DCR. DCR is committed in concept to TMDL reductions as outlined in the Phase 1 Watershed Implementation Plan ( WIP 1) DCR should have actual reduction targets by early 2012., but will be close to WIP 1 targets as follows: 9% reduction – nitrogen 16% reduction –...

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Discount Retailer Goes Above Minimum Standards and is Recognized for Conservation Efforts

Stormwater regulations and local watershed are becoming more rigorous to preserve and protect the eco-systems that are so vital for a sustainable future.  In Onley, Virginia, Wal-Mart  both during construction and with its day-to-day operations implemented strategies and programs that are helping to protect the “limited and sensitive water supply” in the community.  These extraordinary actions of today will become the norm tomorrow with the implementation of the  Chesapeake Bay TMDL and pending EPA Stormwater Rule scheduled to be approved in 2012. Learn more about the strategies applied to the new Wal-Mart store and the award in this article from DelmarvaNow.com http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20110223/ESN01/102230409/Onley-Walmart-recognized?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CEastern%20Shore%20News%7Cs...

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